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Published on Saturday, June 25, 2016

You’re Contributing To Destruction


You’re Contributing To Destruction
 Your Clothing May Be Killing Fish and Destroying the Food Chain

Although this sounds like it could be completely absurd, scientists are now finding out more about our clothing and how it does affect our lakes, oceans, and rivers. These scientists are finding small fibers in the bodies of dead fish that have been washing onto the shore.  These small fibers that are being found in the fish are called microfibers and they can be found on a lot of the clothing that we wear. Do not confuse them with the microbeads that used to be found in some items, but were banned because of their threat to wildlife. 

How are they Dangerous?

Microfibers can be dangerous because they are so small that wildlife see them as something that they eat especially since they’re just floating in the water. These microfibers actually poison the wildlife thus causing a lot of negative activity in our food chain. These microfibers are very toxic when they are eaten by fish. Researchers have found that these microfibers actually make up most of the debris that has been spotted on beaches all over the world. 

Freshwater Hazards

Not only have the fish in the oceans been poisoned by these microfibers, the lakes and rivers are also having problems as well. Many freshwater lakes in the United States have started to see these microfibers in the fish that people are catching. The Great Lakes have been one of the most affected areas in the United States. Many different species of fish and shellfish are currently being tested in order to keep people safe from eating these fish when they are caught. 
Many people are now worried sick about the type of products that could end up in the foods that they eat. Since 2011, researchers have been warning us that the plastics that we dispose of in our homes are ending up in the water where we catch our fish that we eat. These plastics are also coming from the clothes that we wear when we wash them. Synthetic made clothing is really what is causing this problem and there are quite a few companies that use microfibers in their clothing. Most of these companies are very large and popular all over the world. 

How does this Happen?

When you go to wash your clothing, there are quite a few fibers that they are made up of. Some companies will even choose to most that their clothing is made with microfibers such as companies like Patagonia. Their fleece clothing is made up of microfibers that are part of what is causing this terrible problem. When you wash your clothing, the water ends up going to a waste treatment plant where it is then shipped to lakes, oceans, and rivers. There are now plenty of companies like Columbia and Patagonia who are now doing what they can to make sure that the clothing made by them is not problem of the problem. It is a worldwide problem and companies all over the globe are now focused on fixing it. 

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Author: Vrountas

Categories: Blogs, Clothing



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